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Thread: Rate the last movie you've seen

  1. #1186
    Zombie Flesh Eater EvilNed's Avatar
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    Death Walks on High Heels and Death Walks at Midnight

    I don't think Luciano Ercoli is a very competent director. I'm surprised Arrow gave him the special treatment they did with the release of that "Death Walks Twice" feature because all I got was a pretty unimaginative detective story in the first film and a illogical mystery in the other where no attempt is made to tie all the loose ends together.

    I don't think it's very visually stimulating. There's nothing really interesting to see. The sets are all just posh and clean set designs representing whatever they're supposed to be, all shot fairly light which gives it a cheesy porno feel. I don't get any Noir vibes at all, unlike many of the best gialli.

    The music is also not very noteworthy. The biggest problem is probably just the completely uninteresting plots. The first 45 minutes of High Heels is one of the most unimaginative depictions of a dangerous liaison I've ever seen and it goes nowhere slowly. In the end of the (extremely long) first act one of the main characters dies which kicks off the final hour of the film. THAT part was very good. I enjoyed the twists, turns and red herrings.

    Midnight was just completely bonkers. A lady becomes witness to a murder while high on an experimental hallucinogen and then starts to see the killer pop up all over the place. In addition she is approached by all manner of strange persons who claim to know a piece of "the puzzle". But what "the puzzle" is not explained until the very end and we're left with a film where our heroine just wanders from setpiece to setpiece, sees the killer, phones the police and they never once believe her. Repeat ad infinitum.

    By the way, this is my watchlist (see attachment). Looking forward to some of these.

    Attachment 1409giallo2.jpg
    Last edited by EvilNed; 20-Jan-2017 at 08:15 AM. Reason: fsdfsd

    "I worked in a factory owned by Germans, at coal pits owned by Frenchmen, and at a chemical plant owned by Belgians. There I discovered something about capitalists. They are all alike, whatever the nationality. All they wanted from me was the most work for the least money that kept me alive. So I became a Communist." - Ники́та Серге́евич Хрущёв

    "Thanks for Playa Girón. Before the invasion, the revolution was weak. Now it's stronger than ever". - Che Guevara

  2. #1187
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    Quote Originally Posted by EvilNed View Post
    By the way, this is my watchlist (see attachment). Looking forward to some of these.

    Attachment 1409giallo2.jpg
    There's some really good flicks on there - A Bay of Blood, The Bloodstained Butterfly (a more classy affair than usual for gialli, and one which focuses on a murder trial in an atypical twist), Your Vice Is A Locked Room and Only I Have The Key (featuring, quite possibly, Edwige Fenech's best role), Berberian Sound Studio (not a giallo per se, but heavily influenced by them - it's more of a weird dive into psychosis), The Editor (if you've enjoyed previous Astron-6 efforts you'll dig this, too - many giallo references abound), The Case of the Bloody Iris (good fun and one of the George Hilton/Edwige Fenech team-ups that proved so successful in the 1970s), The Case of the Scorpion's Tail, All The Colours of the Dark (kind of trippy, and it includes an element of a weird sex cult), The Black Belly of the Tarantula (surprisingly good), The Bloodstained Shadow (exceedingly atmospheric), and Short Night of Glass Dolls (low on murderous thrills, but it takes a different angle on framing the entire story).

    I've not seen Delirium, Masks, Slaughter Hotel, The Killer Reserved 9 Seats, or The Suspected Death of a Minor.

    Five Dolls For An August Moon is okay, a middling effort, far from Bava's best, but it has some cool elements to it.


  3. #1188
    Zombie Flesh Eater EvilNed's Avatar
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    Ok so there's been a few:

    Your Vice is a locked room and only I have the key
    Sergio Martino's giallo directed somewhere inbetween The Strange Vice of Mrs Wardh (which I loved) and Torso (which I thought was dull). Likewise this one falls somewhere inbetween qualitywise. It's just a little too dirty for me. I love the setting and the characters but Martino is a perv and unlike Mrs Wardh there's just not enough movie magic to make up for it. All of his films feature complicated and destructive relationships between men and women. But in Mrs Wardh it was about a love-hate relationship between two forlorn lovers whereas in Torso it's just a killer who hates women (common giallo theme, by the way). This, again, falls somewhere inbetween. Anita Strindberg's character Irina hates her husband and especially the husbands cat. She is raped by him but finds solace in a mysterious cousin who comes to visit, played by Edwige Fenech. MORE EDWIGE PLEASE.

    Drive
    Never saw it before. It was great! But I wasn't surprised. It was pretty much exactly the film I expected it to be after all the hype. Still great, tho. It features the exact type of storytelling I enjoy; Focused and straightforward but with an extremely stylized look.

    Don't torture a duckling
    I can put my finger on what I usually don't like about Fulci films but none of that applies here to my joyful surprise. A well crafted giallo in an era where they were dime-a-dozen. Fulci fell for the "hey, I better put an animal in my title so people will think this is an Argento-film" scheme. The duckling must refer to the Donald Duck toy, right?

    The Black Belly of the Tarantula
    By-the-numbers giallo with a run-of-the-mill twist. While I can't say I enjoyed it thoroughly, I also divided it into two viewings which is never a good idea for any kind of mystery film. It was pretty and had a great Morricone soundtrack. It desperatly tried to mimic Argento in more ways than one. Urban setting, noirish shots, animal theme. I enjoyed the killings too, they managed to get a perfect mix of sexual and torture without getting too perverted. I wish I could get a hold of a HD copy. It looks like the kind of film you'd enjoy watching in high def in a blackened room. Might revisit this down the line. The murder's identity and motives are not foreshadowed at all which is a big no no.

    The Killer reserved nine seats
    A rather different take on the giallo. 9 upper class snobs get locked into an abandoned theatre and get killed off. Great premise. It's the kind of giallo that's borderline horror rather than thriller or mystery. Too bad the characters just don't act rationally at all. Nobody seems stressed out or particulary worried about the increasing bodycount. The film also doesn't develop a plot and instead focuses on either character encounters or murders. In addition characters keep walking around aimlessly throughout the empty halls of the building despite there being a murder on the loose - occasionally gathering for a meeting whenever a new murder (or attempted murder - of which there's quite a few) has taken place. Then they talk a bit before the film cuts away to one of them walking alone in the cellar... or attic... or some hallway.
    I wonder if there was a thematic case to be made for the Red killer attacking the upper class characters? Quite possible.
    Last edited by EvilNed; 27-Jan-2017 at 08:07 PM. Reason: fsaafs

    "I worked in a factory owned by Germans, at coal pits owned by Frenchmen, and at a chemical plant owned by Belgians. There I discovered something about capitalists. They are all alike, whatever the nationality. All they wanted from me was the most work for the least money that kept me alive. So I became a Communist." - Ники́та Серге́евич Хрущёв

    "Thanks for Playa Girón. Before the invasion, the revolution was weak. Now it's stronger than ever". - Che Guevara

  4. #1189
    crackin' eggs of wisdom bassman's Avatar
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    Just finished Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead, the story of National Lampoon. Aside from a few new anecdotes sprinkled about, it's basically common knowledge how the magazine began, became popular, and spawned some of the greatest comedians and films that are now household names. So nothing drastically new for most fans, but still a well made doc and definitely a must-see for fans of the brand and all the names attached to it.

  5. #1190
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    'Dracula A.D. 72'

    3/10

    Ridiculous and fascinating in equal measures, but ultimately pointless, Hammer's penultimate Lee Dracula film sees poor Chirstopher donning his 19th Century garb to frolic around 70's London, trying to mess with Van Helsing's descendent (poor Peter Cushing) and his granddaughter (Stephanie Beecham).

    This time, Drac has an assistant (Christopher Neame) to help him with his ends and allow him take a back seat - which Lee had been doing since 'Dracula: Prince of Darkness' - popping out occasionally to nibble at the necks of some woefully acted 70's hipsters and one can hardly blame him when they include the stunning Caroline Munro in another Hammer bit part. Of course, it all ends badly for the count in the end as per usual. But, Dracula being a hard man to keep down, he didn't give a tinker's cuss and popped up one more time (with Lee as Dracula) in the equally odd 'The Satanic Rites of Dracula', also set in the "modern" era of 70's Britain. Somewhat thankfully, that film marked the end of Hammer's Dracula series, which really had outlived its sellby date a decade before.

    Hammer would also produce the chop socky influenced 'Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires' in the mid 70's - which Lee flat out refused to be part of - before finally calling it a day with the overworked count.

    Story stupidity aside, 'Dracula A.D. 72' is sort of worth watching if you're a fan of 70's cheese or a Dracula completest. But, there's so much cheese, that there's a real danger of putting on weight or increasing your cholesterol.
    I'm runnin' this monkey farm now Frankenstein.....

  6. #1191
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    Quote Originally Posted by shootemindehead View Post
    'Dracula A.D. 72'

    3/10

    Ridiculous and fascinating in equal measures, but ultimately pointless, Hammer's penultimate Lee Dracula film sees poor Chirstopher donning his 19th Century garb to frolic around 70's London, trying to mess with Van Helsing's descendent (poor Peter Cushing) and his granddaughter (Stephanie Beecham).

    This time, Drac has an assistant (Christopher Neame) to help him with his ends and allow him take a back seat - which Lee had been doing since 'Dracula: Prince of Darkness' - popping out occasionally to nibble at the necks of some woefully acted 70's hipsters and one can hardly blame him when they include the stunning Caroline Munro in another Hammer bit part. Of course, it all ends badly for the count in the end as per usual. But, Dracula being a hard man to keep down, he didn't give a tinker's cuss and popped up one more time (with Lee as Dracula) in the equally odd 'The Satanic Rites of Dracula', also set in the "modern" era of 70's Britain. Somewhat thankfully, that film marked the end of Hammer's Dracula series, which really had outlived its sellby date a decade before.

    Hammer would also produce the chop socky influenced 'Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires' in the mid 70's - which Lee flat out refused to be part of - before finally calling it a day with the overworked count.

    Story stupidity aside, 'Dracula A.D. 72' is sort of worth watching if you're a fan of 70's cheese or a Dracula completest. But, there's so much cheese, that there's a real danger of putting on weight or increasing your cholesterol.
    The most ridiculous of the Lee Dracula movies was Taste the Blood of Dracula. The ending doesn't make any sense. To this day no one has satisfactorily explained why exactly did Dracula die at the end of that movie. I don't think that even the filmmakers themselves know what exactly is it that is supposed to have happened at the end.

  7. #1192
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    The most ridiculous of the Lee Dracula movies was Taste the Blood of Dracula. The ending doesn't make any sense. To this day no one has satisfactorily explained why exactly did Dracula die at the end of that movie. I don't think that even the filmmakers themselves know what exactly is it that is supposed to have happened at the end.
    "Paul takes the Black Mass items out of the church. Suddenly the church is "holy" again and Dracula is overwhelmed and loopy and then falls to his death."
    Look again at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there--on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam. [click for more]
    -Carl Sagan

  8. #1193
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    Money Monster - 7.5/10

    A solid thriller with a few good sidesteps of cliches at certain points (e.g. you think a moment will go one way, but it goes in the opposite direction). Perhaps it doesn't dig into the deeper issues quite as much as it could have, but it's a lean and efficient thriller with a strong theme, and good central performances. A good watch.

    Quote Originally Posted by EvilNed View Post
    Your Vice is a locked room and only I have the key
    Sergio Martino's giallo directed somewhere inbetween The Strange Vice of Mrs Wardh (which I loved) and Torso (which I thought was dull). Likewise this one falls somewhere inbetween qualitywise. It's just a little too dirty for me. I love the setting and the characters but Martino is a perv and unlike Mrs Wardh there's just not enough movie magic to make up for it. All of his films feature complicated and destructive relationships between men and women. But in Mrs Wardh it was about a love-hate relationship between two forlorn lovers whereas in Torso it's just a killer who hates women (common giallo theme, by the way). This, again, falls somewhere inbetween. Anita Strindberg's character Irina hates her husband and especially the husbands cat. She is raped by him but finds solace in a mysterious cousin who comes to visit, played by Edwige Fenech. MORE EDWIGE PLEASE.

    Drive
    Never saw it before. It was great! But I wasn't surprised. It was pretty much exactly the film I expected it to be after all the hype. Still great, tho. It features the exact type of storytelling I enjoy; Focused and straightforward but with an extremely stylized look.
    1) Arguably Fenech's best role in terms of character, but not necessarily her best film. That said, I really enjoyed it a second time around, and Anita Strindberg is excellent in the film. It was one of those giallo films (of which there were a few) that was inspired, in some part, by Poe's The Black Cat.

    2) I love that movie. Every time I watch it I dig it more. It's unfortunate that Refn has moved further and further away from that with "Only God Forgives" and most recently "The Neon Demon" - he's lost the heart and humour that Drive has (which helps balance the tone completely). It's also one of those movies that makes you, as the viewer, feel like the coolest dude on the planet. The music, the visual style, the Driver's sense of masculinity etc, all drive towards that ... excuse the pun.

    Quote Originally Posted by bassman View Post
    Just finished Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead, the story of National Lampoon. Aside from a few new anecdotes sprinkled about, it's basically common knowledge how the magazine began, became popular, and spawned some of the greatest comedians and films that are now household names. So nothing drastically new for most fans, but still a well made doc and definitely a must-see for fans of the brand and all the names attached to it.
    I didn't know that much about the magazine (if anything much at all, really). I'd seen a few movies in the Lampoon stable, and knew of some people who had come from it, but that was it ... so for me, as someone fairly uninitiated, it was very informative and enjoyable to watch.

  9. #1194
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil View Post
    "Paul takes the Black Mass items out of the church. Suddenly the church is "holy" again and Dracula is overwhelmed and loopy and then falls to his death."
    Unfortunately, that still does not explain how can it have killed Dracula. The most it would have done is make him leave the church.

  10. #1195
    Chasing Prey shootemindehead's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    The most ridiculous of the Lee Dracula movies was Taste the Blood of Dracula. The ending doesn't make any sense. To this day no one has satisfactorily explained why exactly did Dracula die at the end of that movie. I don't think that even the filmmakers themselves know what exactly is it that is supposed to have happened at the end.
    Haven't seen that one in ages, since I was a kid. But, I'm in a campy mood, so the 70's ones are getting an outing.

    I'll burn through the "proper" Hammer Draculas after I get that out of my system.
    I'm runnin' this monkey farm now Frankenstein.....

  11. #1196
    Zombie Flesh Eater EvilNed's Avatar
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    Otto e Mezzo
    Fellini's highly regarded masterpiece. As far as I know, it is considered his best work. I've only seen two films of his, including this one. I watched it in an attempt to indulge some high brow italian art and not just sleazy thrillers. Great film! I really enjoyed it. Guido's world of women, art and culture draws you in and has you guessing what it all means. There's no real conflict, just an investigation into the mind of an artist who's reached the top of his career with no idea of where to go next.

    Blind Alley
    A swedish drama about two brothers in the projects, one of whom is shot by a killer roaming the streets. The background of the film, the immigrant targeting killer roaming the streets, is based on real events that took place in Malmö 2009-2010. They're trying to live by as honest folks but the necessity for money (to pay for an operation) forces them into crime. Cue: Crime never pays. Not sure if the film is jabbing at the swedish socialized healthcare, which is free but with a waiting list of 2 years for some operations, or the danish privatized healthcare, who can treat you in two weeks time if you've got the dough... Anyway, efficiently told film. I enjoyed it. Nothing new really, we've seen it all before, but it's simple and efficient.

    A Street cat named Bob
    A feel good film about a homeless junkie roaming the streets of (what I assume to be) London and gets help from his new best friend: A equally homeless ginger cat named Bob. Bob rides his shoulders to work into town, helping him with selling The Big Issue (one of this Homeless-aid magazines) and perform with his guitar. Surprisingly entertaining to watch a cute cat lift an otherwise decidedly average film.

    The Bloodstained Butterfly
    There's two kinds of giallo. There's sleazy and there's stylish. This one's stylish. It doesn't really deliver on the murder side, most deaths are off screen, but it does deliver on the mystery, the style and the drama. I liked it a lot and having enjoyed both this and Puzzle (L'uomo senza memoria) I'm eagerly looking forward to checking out Death occurred last night, also by Duccio Tessari.

    Strip Nude for your Killer
    I saw this on shudder. First off, this is as sleazy as it gets. Almost unforgivingly so. It's also the most chauvinistic film I've ever seen. The main protagonist more or less rapes a girl in the first scene. There's loads of other crazy things that follow. But in the end, that's part of it's entertainment value. The characters in this film are so absurdly abnormal in their behavior and reactions to occurances (many of them sexual) that you end up laughing at it. Anyone ever listen to that podcast My Dad wrote a porno and laughed at how contrived some of those sexual rendezvous' are? This film is just like that. Much to be said here... This is the kind of film that makes you realize there really is a rape culture out there where women really have little to no say over their own sexuality.
    With all that said... Don't show it to your kids or view it as a moral compass. But if you're in for a laugh, go ahead.

    "I worked in a factory owned by Germans, at coal pits owned by Frenchmen, and at a chemical plant owned by Belgians. There I discovered something about capitalists. They are all alike, whatever the nationality. All they wanted from me was the most work for the least money that kept me alive. So I became a Communist." - Ники́та Серге́евич Хрущёв

    "Thanks for Playa Girón. Before the invasion, the revolution was weak. Now it's stronger than ever". - Che Guevara

  12. #1197
    Chasing Prey shootemindehead's Avatar
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    'Arrival'

    8/10

    Very good sci-fi, but slow and methodical. Amy Adams is good for her money, but TBH, I'm getting sick of Jeremy Brenner turning up in every film. He does notthing for me whatsoever. The story is surprisingly light, but contains enough for contemplation afterwards, but the "romance" felt out of place and tacked on. The design is very well handled, but the cinematography is as dull as dishwater. Having not seen this is the pictures, I thought that I was watching a bad copy or something. It's a shame, because it feels fake. I live in Ireland and we have dull, overcast, days for weeks at a time. But it's never as dull as the state shown in 'Arrival'. Recommended, if you like straightlaced sci-fi.


    'Murder by Death'

    1/10

    One of the worst efforts at comedy I've seen in a long, long time. Everything falls flat and the only reason for the 1/10 is Eileen Brennan. Astonishingly, this nonsense boasts numerous big names (in 1976), like Peter Falk, Alec Guinness and Peter Sellers - in a role that's so crass, I don't know whether it was bloody awful or some kind of warpped, inspired, genius. There's even a part for Truman Copote, who proves he couldn't act his way put of a wet paper bag. Terrible, terrible film.
    I'm runnin' this monkey farm now Frankenstein.....

  13. #1198
    crackin' eggs of wisdom bassman's Avatar
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    Funny you mention it because I was just recently reading some trivia on Arrival and the director mentioned that he wanted it to look muted and depressing. Something along the lines of "a rainy day on the school bus as a kid, when all you can do is stare out the wet window" he said. I think they achieved that, whether the viewer is accepting of it or not.

    When I finished Arrival my first thought was that it gives me even more confidence in the director's sequel to Blade Runner.

  14. #1199
    Chasing Prey shootemindehead's Avatar
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    The problem is though Bassy, is that it doesn't quite look like a rainy day (except of course in the scenes when it was raining). It just looks like a dull filter and I found myself not watching the film and wondering why the director was using such dull visuals. Anyhow, it doesn't impact really on the story, so in the long run it's neither here nor there I spose. It just didn't look right, if you know what I mean.

    The only thing about the 'Blade Runner' sequel that I'm hoping for is that Deckard is a human and not an OAP robot. If I even get a sniff that he's a replicant, I just won't bother with it at all. Scott's retrofitting of the Deckard replicant nonsense throws up numerous issuse with the whole story as far as I'm concerned and lessens the original film considerably. I'm a fan of the international cut, either with or without the voiceover.

    As for the Villeneuve, on the back of 'Arrival' - 'Prisoners', 'Enemy' and 'Sicario' just got bumped to the To Do list.
    I'm runnin' this monkey farm now Frankenstein.....

  15. #1200
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    Quote Originally Posted by shootemindehead View Post
    As for the Villeneuve, on the back of 'Arrival' - 'Prisoners', 'Enemy' and 'Sicario' just got bumped to the To Do list.
    Prisoners, Enemy, and Sicario - all good flicks.

    Prisoners is perhaps a bit too long, but it's effectively grim and dark in story, tone, and visuals (but not of the 'dishwater' variety). I remember getting quite sucked into that one.

    Enemy is strange and intriguing, and I got a few whiffs of early Cronenberg in strange ways in some of the settings. It's a curious, moody kind of film, and Gyllanhaal gives a fine performance.

    Sicario - my favourite of these three - Roger Deakins on DoP duties (he's working with Villeneuve on Blade Runner 2049), a superb soundtrack, excellent performances and characters, and a tough script that takes a pragmatic, no-nonsense, harsh reality kind of approach to the drug war. I got it on DVD a little while ago and I'm eager to give it another spin. If I remember correctly there's a sequel in-the-works (I was surprised it was being lined up for a sequel, but I'm intrigued and hoping it'll live up to the first film).

    My personal ranking of those three would be:
    1) Sicario
    2) Prisoners
    3) Enemy
    Last edited by MinionZombie; 12-Feb-2017 at 04:16 PM.

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