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Thread: Rate the last movie you've seen

  1. #1396
    Team Rick MinionZombie's Avatar
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    Kong: Skull Island - 7/10

    Good fun generally, although there's something I can't quite put my finger on that's missing from it ... perhaps it's just me getting over this damn cold/flu thing I caught over the holidays ... anyway, I did quite enjoy it.

    Hidden Figures - 8/10

    Occasionally it edges towards softballing the culture of racism surrounding the leads, but not every film dealing with race needs to be go hard on the subject. It's a fascinating story about these three switched-on people who think ahead of the curve and move according to projections rather than where things are at that moment. A side of the space race that wasn't really explored before. Good flick.

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    Slugs (1988) 6.5/10

    Classic '80s B movie cheese. Giant mutated flesh eating slugs grow in the sewer and come up through the toilets and sinks and attack people and whatever else gets in their way. Complete with bad acting, dumb dialog, gratuitous nudity, and LOTS of fake blood. Amazingly, I just read that it was actually based on a novel. Fairly entertaining and far from the worst thing I've ever seen. I vaguely remember seeing it as a little kid, probably on USA Up All Night.
    Last edited by beat_truck; 09-Jan-2018 at 06:11 PM. Reason: typo

  3. #1398
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    Quote Originally Posted by beat_truck View Post
    Slugs (1988) 6.5/10

    Classic '80s B movie cheese. Giant mutated flesh eating slugs grow in the sewer and come up through the toilets and sinks and attack people and whatever else gets in their way. Complete with bad acting, dumb dialog, gratuitous nudity, and LOTS of fake blood. Amazingly, I just read that it was actually based on a novel. Fairly entertaining and far from the worst thing I've ever seen. I vaguely remember seeing it as a little kid, probably on USA Up All Night.
    I saw that one just a few months ago for the first time (there's a good Arrow Video Blu-Ray out now), and it's a fun flick. There's a surprising amount of 'alcoholism' subtext, either people who are drunk, have a drinking problem, or who drink and then bad things happen to them. Good gore and effects, too.

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    Being Attacked beat_truck's Avatar
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    Graveyard Disturbance (1987) 4/10
    An Italian made for TV horror/comedy movie that didn't do a very good job of either category. Just dull and stupid for the most part. Not the good Italian horror cheese that I expected and normally enjoy. It felt kind of like a rip off/combination of The Goonies and Scooby Doo. I think they blew half of the budget running the fog machines through almost the entire movie.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by MinionZombie View Post
    There's a surprising amount of 'alcoholism' subtext, either people who are drunk, have a drinking problem, or who drink and then bad things happen to them.
    I've noticed that in a lot of horror movies. If you have sex, drink, smoke pot, or even cigarettes, you are usually doomed to die first.

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    The Final - 2010: It's sort of like Revenge of the Nerds, only the nerds have gone psycho this time!

    The First Power - 1990: Pretty cool action/thriller with Lou Diamond Phillips playing an L.A.P.D. homicide detective trying to stop a supposedly "dead" Satanist serial killer who has actually been given (apparently by his "boss" down there) the ability to possess living bodies.

  6. #1401
    Zombie Flesh Eater EvilNed's Avatar
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    Addio zio Tom, or Goodbye Uncle Tom

    An italian mondo, or faked staged documentary set in the southern states of America sometime in the 1830's. An italian journalist follows the journey of the unfortunate slaves as they disembark at port and are processed for sale. It depicts a lot of gruesome scenes and events, all of them staged, in order to give the viewer a picture of what it was like in the south at the time. Including rape, torture, castration, disease and the value of certain types of slaves and who were usually in the market for what type. It also takes a jab at several american heroes, such as James Bowie (apparently a hero of the battle of Alamo) who was a slave trader.

    All of this is presented in a rather humorous and crazy manner. The film itself is absolutely bonkers, yet still very serious.

    It's sort of like if Terry Gilliam had directed a documentary on the holocaust.



  7. #1402
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    Sorcerer

    William Friedkin's forgotten, but recently reappraised, drama. You can see an element of hubris in the film which makes sense considering the 74 minute interview with the filmmaker on the subject of the film (at the time he'd come off of The French Connection and The Exorcist, which had both been hugely popular, and essentially he could do anything he wanted). It cost about $14 million at the time, so quite pricey, and then bombed at the box office.

    However, it seems to be getting a lot of love now four decades on. I watched it for the first time last night and quite enjoyed it. It does plod a bit in the first half - it's only at the half-way mark that the main mission of the movie kicks into gear (transporting highly unstable dynamite 200 miles through dense jungle and perilous mountain passes), but once it does it gets nail-bitingly tense at times. It's got that great, gritty 70s aesthetic and the 'antiheroes' to match (a getaway driver, an embezzler, an assassin, and a terrorist), and being that it was all done for real (in the Dominican Republic, IIRC) it really does feel as sweaty and dangerous as the images on screen. The sight of a lumbering truck edging across a rain-lashed rope bridge as it swings in the wind (all done for real) is probably the film's greatest sequence. At times the trucks are at a 45 degree angle just swinging in the turbulence ... astonishing stuff.

    It could have used some judicious trimming, even at script stage, to better pace its first half, but it's well worth checking out. Stars Roy Scheider.

    The 74 minute interview on the Blu-Ray with Friedkin - conducted by Nicolas Winding Refn - is very informative, but sporadically infuriating as Refn keeps 'rewinding' history to pose another one of his questions, and Refn's sense of humour doesn't translate particularly well on-screen ... at times it feels positively pretentious (if he seriously believes "Only God Forgives" is a 'masterpiece' then he's a fool, sure it's good, but it's no masterpiece ... hopefully he was just being quite wry in his delivery of that statement). Similarly, Refn obsesses over certain topics or questions to an almost embarrassing degree (the final question is asked three times in increasingly exasperating ways with Friedkin - a friend of Refn's - incapable of giving Refn what he's looking for).

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    Zombie Flesh Eater EvilNed's Avatar
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    Sorcerer was good but I thought the four opening sequences were really unnecessary. I had no idea what was going on, or how it would tie in with the rest of the movie. Furthermore, by the time the Palestinian terrorist reentered the story I'd pretty much forgotten who he was in first place - leaving me wondering what the hell that whole thing was about.

    I think it was a mistake to give them film such a long opening act. In addition, I'd already seen Wages of Fear so I pretty much knew what was going to happen (this film is a remake of it) which took a lot of suspension away from it I guess.

    Awesome sets tho. The music was pretty good too. Roy Scheider did his job good enough.

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    The Return Of Josey Wales (1986) 4/10

    A low budget, almost totally unknown sequel to The Outlaw Josey Wales. It was apparently filmed and released straight to VHS and has never been released on modern media. I have an original VHS copy I found a few years ago at Salvation Army that I never watched and nearly forgot about until I saw it on Youtube. It's watchable, but not very good at all. No Clint Eastwood. BLAND story, characters, acting and writing. Some half hearted attempts at comedy that failed miserably. Hard to follow at times due to the poor writing, HORRENDOUS sound quality, and poor night time filming. I've seen movies from the early 30s that had as good or better SQ, and low budget movies from the 50s that looked WAY better. I just tried my VHS copy and it is a little better quality than what's on Youtube. Maybe I'll rewatch it again someday and see if I get anything more out of it.
    Last edited by beat_truck; 12-Jan-2018 at 06:14 AM. Reason: forgot rating

  10. #1405
    Chasing Prey shootemindehead's Avatar
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    'Sorcerer' is one of my favorite 70's films, with 'Wages of Fear' being one of my favorite 50's films.

    It's a pity it didn't do better in its time. But then again, it was 'Star Wars' fever. It's difficult to understand nowadays just how destructive 'Star Wars' was to every other film's BO in 1977.
    I'm runnin' this monkey farm now Frankenstein.....

  11. #1406
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    Quote Originally Posted by EvilNed View Post
    Sorcerer was good but I thought the four opening sequences were really unnecessary. I had no idea what was going on, or how it would tie in with the rest of the movie. Furthermore, by the time the Palestinian terrorist reentered the story I'd pretty much forgotten who he was in first place - leaving me wondering what the hell that whole thing was about.

    I think it was a mistake to give them film such a long opening act. In addition, I'd already seen Wages of Fear so I pretty much knew what was going to happen (this film is a remake of it) which took a lot of suspension away from it I guess.
    I've wondered whether it might have been better if they'd started the movie in that hellhole they've all ended up in, but then reveal who each of them is and why they're there, because as you say, it's very disorienting at the beginning. I did have a little trouble getting all the faces matched to the opening acts - for one thing, they're all very scruffy in comparison to their introductions - naturally, you know who Roy Scheider is (being familiar with the actor, but also because of his very unique face). The four introductions do make the film feel kind of unbalanced and you do have to hang in there (the movie is basically advertised on the basis of the back half).

    Friedkin was talking about his intentions being to examine "fate", how all these men were meant to come together in this dreadful place because of fate. I can see what he's doing with that, but I think the problem is the structure of the storytelling. Slightly more efficient "this is why they're here" scenes interspersed throughout the film during the set up (just before they head off in the trucks) might have worked better.

    That all said, I dug it (particularly as I've not seen Wages of Fear).

    Quote Originally Posted by shootemindehead View Post
    'Sorcerer' is one of my favorite 70's films, with 'Wages of Fear' being one of my favorite 50's films.

    It's a pity it didn't do better in its time. But then again, it was 'Star Wars' fever. It's difficult to understand nowadays just how destructive 'Star Wars' was to every other film's BO in 1977.
    Aye, Friedkin was saying on the disc's interview that Star Wars just swept everything aside and that at the time it was a total sea change which smacked right out of the blue.

  12. #1407
    Chasing Prey shootemindehead's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MinionZombie View Post
    Aye, Friedkin was saying on the disc's interview that Star Wars just swept everything aside and that at the time it was a total sea change which smacked right out of the blue.
    Additionally, calling the film 'Sorcerer' didn't help. A lot of folk (in the States) complained that the film wasn't about sorcery and wanted their money back. That wouldn't have flown this side of the pond.

    Others didn't know what the title actually meant and couldn't let it go.

    I don't think a different name would salvaged much more of the BO, in the light of the 'Star Wars' thing, mind you. But it could have helped.

    Interestingly, the film was actually written for Steve McQueen. But he wanted a part for Ali McGraw and for it to be shot in the US. Which, frankly would have ruined the whole thing. McQueen then wanted McGraw to be on the film as a producer and Friedkin said no and had to go with Scheider instead. I think all of the guys in the film are great though. They feel natural and realistic. Free of "movieness", as it were.

    In any case, the film has some outstanding scenes that just wouldn't be filmed today, like the crossing the bridge in the storm scene. Mad stuff altogether,
    I'm runnin' this monkey farm now Frankenstein.....

  13. #1408
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    Quote Originally Posted by shootemindehead View Post
    I don't think a different name would salvaged much more of the BO, in the light of the 'Star Wars' thing, mind you. But it could have helped.

    Interestingly, the film was actually written for Steve McQueen. But he wanted a part for Ali McGraw and for it to be shot in the US. Which, frankly would have ruined the whole thing. McQueen then wanted McGraw to be on the film as a producer and Friedkin said no and had to go with Scheider instead. I think all of the guys in the film are great though. They feel natural and realistic. Free of "movieness", as it were.

    In any case, the film has some outstanding scenes that just wouldn't be filmed today, like the crossing the bridge in the storm scene. Mad stuff altogether,
    1) Yeah, the title is curious from an outside perspective. It only makes any sense once you notice the second truck (the one seen on the poster, with the 'toothy grill') is named "Sorcerer") ... but even then, considering events of the movie, the title still doesn't make an awful lot of sense.

    2) Yep, it's the sort of movie that simply had to be filmed in the 'cinematic wilds' like Aguirre, Wrath of God or something like that. You can't fake that kind of atmosphere.

    3) The bridge sequence is absolutely stunning. All the more impressive in today's world of CGI and green/blue screen. Modern audiences really respond to things truly being done in-camera. Whenever you have a modern movie that does things for real it's all the more impressive ... think of the climax of Death Proof, or Mad Max Fury Road in general (yes, it had a lot of CGI in it, but that mostly only extended to the environment adding in mountains, rocks, or that huge electrical storm tornado ... or the occasional bit of compositing required so they didn't risk the lives of their principal actors). Sorcerer, of course, is the real deal throughout the entire film, and all the more impressive for it.

  14. #1409
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    Train To Busan (2016) 7/10
    It was SURPRISINGLY good. Easily the best modern zombie movie I've seen since The Dead and The Dead 2: India. It actually had characters I gave a damn about, decent acting, and OK effects. It had some similarities to World War Z, but I liked this movie BETTER, which I guess isn't necessarily saying a lot. I saw it because it was recommended on this forum. I probably would have never known about it otherwise, or I would have overlooked it, figuring it was total crap. The only things I didn't like were the subtitles, and the zombies were the modern, fast, dinosaur shrieking, milky contact wearing type. I will ALWAYS like the slow, Romero style zombies better.
    Last edited by beat_truck; 14-Jan-2018 at 02:18 AM. Reason: typo

  15. #1410
    Chasing Prey shootemindehead's Avatar
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    I was probably a touch disapointed with it. But it's memorable and the logic holds up for the most part.

    The ending was awfuly sad.

    [sarcasm]Can't wait for the inevitable US remake[/sarcasm]
    I'm runnin' this monkey farm now Frankenstein.....

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