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Thread: So which Night film is canon to George's series, original or remake?

  1. #16
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    I strongly disagree, but I don't care enough to argue about it because in the end - Land isn't that great of a film anyway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EvilNed View Post
    I strongly disagree, but I don't care enough to argue about it because in the end - Land isn't that great of a film anyway.
    I agree with the last bit (it is not "bad" either, but not as good as the previous films), but I still maintain that the number of problems in seeing Land as happening after Day is greater than the other way around. Some easy examples if one takes the Land happens after Day point of view:

    1- Less decayed zombies & cities/towns than in Day

    2- Outposts around since early on in the zombie crisis in Land, yet for the people in Day the possibility of going to such outposts is totally unknown or so out of the question that no one even bothers to bring them up anymore (in fact, the issue of where to go to is a big problem for those who are entertaining the idea of leaving the bunker, so much so that Dr. Logan uses it to shut up Rhodes when he threatens to take his men and leave)

    3- People in Day could communicate with others even as far up as Washington DC, but eventually they could not find anyone else around, yet the people in the outposts of Land have communications still up and running

    4- Money still has value in the world of Land. Money is worthless in the more devastated & decayed world of Day

    5- Humans can still venture outside of the outposts with relative safety in Land. In Day going out of the confines of a bunker is deemed very risky and therefore not often practiced, and even then only with helicopters

    6- In Land large numbers of humans are still able to live on ground level with relative safety. In Day even what's left of the national government itself has gone underground

    Now the other way around, obvious problems if one takes the point of view that Day happens after Land:

    1- ???

    Can't think of one!
    Last edited by JDP; 14-Feb-2018 at 07:32 PM. Reason: ;

  3. #18
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    Night 90 was only made to make some revenue off of the license anyway. 60's Night will always be canon to me. I also agree because of the difference in era's, you really can't put these flicks into a proper canon timeline like already stated prior.

    Although, Land of the Dead clearly takes place after Day of the Dead haha.
    "That's the deal, right? The people who are living have it harder, right? the whole world is haunted now and there's no getting out of that, not until we're dead."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Moon Knight View Post
    Although, Land of the Dead clearly takes place after Day of the Dead haha.
    I agree.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Moon Knight View Post
    Although, Land of the Dead clearly takes place after Day of the Dead haha.
    The "haha" part must be in reference to the "clearly" part, because it is anything but

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    As much as I like the '90 remake, the '68 original version is canon. It's the one that started it all. The grand daddy of the whole sub genre.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    I agree with the last bit (it is not "bad" either, but not as good as the previous films), but I still maintain that the number of problems in seeing Land as happening after Day is greater than the other way around. Some easy examples if one takes the Land happens after Day point of view:

    1- Less decayed zombies & cities/towns than in Day
    We've been through all those points before and I disagree with pretty much all of them.

    As for Day taking place before Land, (or vice versa) - the strongest indicator to me personally is that Land clearly takes place 3-5 years after the outbreak (I forgot which they said in the film) whereas to me the people in Day are acting as if the outbreak started within a year ago. When they visit Fort Meyers they're still hoping to find someone, whereas in Land they know there's nothing left.

    In Land they also have a way of coping with the new world - they've adapted to it. Whereas in Day, they're still clinging on to the hope that the old one isn't over year.
    Last edited by EvilNed; 15-Feb-2018 at 06:30 AM. Reason: dsfdsfsdf

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    I agree with the last bit (it is not "bad" either, but not as good as the previous films), but I still maintain that the number of problems in seeing Land as happening after Day is greater than the other way around. Some easy examples if one takes the Land happens after Day point of view:

    1- Less decayed zombies & cities/towns than in Day

    2- Outposts around since early on in the zombie crisis in Land, yet for the people in Day the possibility of going to such outposts is totally unknown or so out of the question that no one even bothers to bring them up anymore (in fact, the issue of where to go to is a big problem for those who are entertaining the idea of leaving the bunker, so much so that Dr. Logan uses it to shut up Rhodes when he threatens to take his men and leave)

    3- People in Day could communicate with others even as far up as Washington DC, but eventually they could not find anyone else around, yet the people in the outposts of Land have communications still up and running

    4- Money still has value in the world of Land. Money is worthless in the more devastated & decayed world of Day

    5- Humans can still venture outside of the outposts with relative safety in Land. In Day going out of the confines of a bunker is deemed very risky and therefore not often practiced, and even then only with helicopters

    6- In Land large numbers of humans are still able to live on ground level with relative safety. In Day even what's left of the national government itself has gone underground

    Now the other way around, obvious problems if one takes the point of view that Day happens after Land:

    1- ???

    Can't think of one!
    I'll indulge you this one time, JDP.

    1) There are many reasons for the look of the zombies changing or not changing. One is the ability of practical effects, another is the available budget. Comparing Land of the Dead to The Walking Dead shows major leaps and bounds in terms of what can be achieved with zombies, but also in how they cast the zombie roles as on TWD they regularly cast quite thin people to show the decay off more (it also allows them to build upon the actor without the zombie appearing too 'bulky').

    In Land of the Dead the principal cast of zombies were all your normal, every day actors - so they'll be of a normal, healthy, human build.

    Can't think of one very decayed looking zombie in Land of the Dead?

    Go to 0:31 in the video.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZT3GWgqz-Q

    As for the decay of the cities. We only saw one city in Day, and the damage there was cosmetic (for obvious reasons - lack of budget, no easy use of CGI). Apocalyptic, no doubt, but it was mostly detritus on the streets, some newspapers blowing around, a few smashed up cars and such. Land of the Dead, on the other hand, shows far more of the world around it in various states (including long, overgrowing plants - passage of time).

    2) All we know is the situation of the people in the bunker inside Day. We get very little information about what's going on in the outside world. The people they were talking to might have gone AWOL, or the link broke down (McDermott's radio is woefully out of date, remember, and barely functioning). Day is mankind scattered to the wind, the dazed chaos of a species that has been knocked for six - Land is the coming together afterwards. It simply is not in mankind's nature to just drift off into nothingness after getting battered.

    3) They re-established communications with communities they re-established. Kaufman explains himself that he paid for the setting up of these communities (which makes it clear that he was doing something after the fall of mankind, to rejuvenate the species' hold on the planet and not let it fall to the zombies forever). They took back sections of the world, built new defences, and gathered people back together again and reorganised them. That's one of the major points/themes that Land is working with - reflected in the zombies themselves, whose evolution in understanding is absolutely, positively, clearly AFTER the events of Day of the Dead and Bub. Bub goes from average-ish zombie to recognising Rhodes' rank and seeking revenge for the death of Logan. In Land we see Big Daddy go from lone wolf aware of what's happening to a leader of an entire army, putting guns in the hands of fellow zombies and teaching them (albeit crudely) how to fire them, he even instructs certain zombies (the Butcher) to perform tasks when their progress is hindered. Bub was never at that level - the evolution of the zombies alone screams loud and proud that Land takes place after Day. Romero spoke about it repeatedly himself, of Land's zombies being an evolution of those from Day. Evolution doesn't go backwards in time.

    4) *sigh* Again, this has been discussed to death, but the basics of it is thus: mankind understands the value of money and the cash-for-services system. It was a system that mankind had grown up on, and it would have only been 'put aside by the apocalypse' for what, a couple of years? They've got enough to deal with, establishing an entirely brand new economic system isn't going to be a priority. Also, if you didn't have that, you'd bugger up the entire plotline of Kaufman being the rich man in the ivory tower - he's using old world power and influence in the apocalypse to re-establish mankind as it once was. Money still has power, and is a simple system that is already understood by every single human being in that (and other) settlements. The thread dedicated to the subject went over it in far more detail - but suffice it to say, money in Land absolutely makes sense.

    5) By the time we come to Land the people have got used to the zombies - again, this was one of Romero's clearly stated objectives with the film as far back as the original script he wrote in the 1990s. It was about 'stepping over the problem and ignoring it', so therefore it stands to reason that the humans would be pretty capable of dealing with the zombies. However, even still, people get bitten, but for the most part we see people venturing out in organised groups (see points 2 and 3) with military vehicles, distraction techniques, body armour, and weapons galore. They've discovered ways to keep the zombies occupied (the "sky flowers") so they meet little resistance as they scavenge.

    In Day of the Dead you've got a handful of people with no organised pool of vehicles, weapons, armour, and certainly not the amount of people that they had scrounged together from the streets of Fiddler's Green to do the job. You've got a pilot, a radio man, a scientist, and one (collapsing) military guy. They're not a strong unit for venturing into the world.

    6) They've chosen a tactical location - what is almost an island (surrounded by rivers with the bridges up) - and the one strip of land is heavily guarded and defended. They explicitly state that the zombies got wise to the electric fences and opted to sod off elsewhere. In Day of the Dead, the particular group we follow, have been dumped into an old missile silo at a moment's notice (Sarah states that the whole operation was hastily put together - in the heat of the initial outbreak - they went there a few weeks in and have been stuck there for months). Land shows mankind getting themselves re-organised after the events of Day, which shows how mankind scurried to the nearest defendable safe place in a panic. Land shows mankind has taken a breather, got themselves together, and striking out into the world again. Simples.

    Quote Originally Posted by EvilNed View Post
    As for Day taking place before Land, (or vice versa) - the strongest indicator to me personally is that Land clearly takes place 3-5 years after the outbreak (I forgot which they said in the film) whereas to me the people in Day are acting as if the outbreak started within a year ago. When they visit Fort Meyers they're still hoping to find someone, whereas in Land they know there's nothing left.

    In Land they also have a way of coping with the new world - they've adapted to it. Whereas in Day, they're still clinging on to the hope that the old one isn't over year.
    Aye. There's an explicit reference to 'the last car rolled out of here THREE YEARS ago', in concern to Riley's missing car that he had wanted to take to Canada.

    In Day, meanwhile, any references they make to time are a matter of MONTHS.
    Last edited by MinionZombie; 15-Feb-2018 at 10:21 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EvilNed View Post
    We've been through all those points before and I disagree with pretty much all of them.
    I don't see what's there to "disagree", unless you think that the people in Day are the stupidest, most sadomasochist & suicidal bunch ever, who enjoy being surrounded by the living dead instead of choosing the relative safety of one of these outposts which had been around since early on during the zombie crisis. But that is not what the movie shows us. These survivors in the bunker are desperate to either find a solution (the scientists) or at least a safe place to get away from the zombies (the soldiers.) And you cannot blame it on their "orders" since for a while now there has been nothing resembling a central government issuing "orders" to anyone anymore. These people are doing what they are doing not because some top cat in Washington is still pushing them to do so, but because they pretty much have no other choice left. A very different situation from that of Land, where things still look somewhat hopeful.

    As for Day taking place before Land, (or vice versa) - the strongest indicator to me personally is that Land clearly takes place 3-5 years after the outbreak (I forgot which they said in the film) whereas to me the people in Day are acting as if the outbreak started within a year ago. When they visit Fort Meyers they're still hoping to find someone,
    There is no time reference implied in Day. For all we know those guys have been around for years into the zombie crisis as well.

    whereas in Land they know there's nothing left.
    Nothing left? These outposts (and there's certainly more than just one) have THOUSANDS of survivors still thriving in plain daylight! Again, a striking difference with what we see in Day, where the much lower number of survivors are pretty much forced to live in bunkers.

    In Land they also have a way of coping with the new world - they've adapted to it. Whereas in Day, they're still clinging on to the hope that the old one isn't over year.
    They've "adapted" to a much less decayed & devastated world than the one of Day. The "adaptation" we see in Day is that of a much more desperate world, where humans are now vastly outnumbered by hordes of zombies.
    Last edited by JDP; 15-Feb-2018 at 03:25 PM. Reason: ;

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    I don't see what's there to "disagree", unless you think that the people in Day are the stupidest, most sadomasochist & suicidal bunch ever, who enjoy being surrounded by the living dead instead of choosing the relative safety of one of these outposts which had been around since early on during the zombie crisis. But that is not what the movie shows us. These survivors in the bunker are desperate to either find a solution (the scientists) or at least a safe place to get away from the zombies (the soldiers.) And you cannot blame it on their "orders" since for a while now there has been nothing resembling a central government issuing "orders" to anyone anymore. These people are doing what they are doing not because some top cat in Washington is still pushing them to do so, but because they pretty much have no other choice left. A very different situation from that of Land, where things still look somewhat hopeful.
    The Soldiers in Day are only just realizing that they are cut off from the outside world. The film depicts the moment when they collectively realize that they are on their own. There is a scene in this film which explicitly states this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MinionZombie View Post
    I'll indulge you this one time, JDP.

    1) There are many reasons for the look of the zombies changing or not changing. One is the ability of practical effects, another is the available budget. Comparing Land of the Dead to The Walking Dead shows major leaps and bounds in terms of what can be achieved with zombies, but also in how they cast the zombie roles as on TWD they regularly cast quite thin people to show the decay off more (it also allows them to build upon the actor without the zombie appearing too 'bulky').

    In Land of the Dead the principal cast of zombies were all your normal, every day actors - so they'll be of a normal, healthy, human build.

    Can't think of one very decayed looking zombie in Land of the Dead?


    As for the decay of the cities. We only saw one city in Day, and the damage there was cosmetic (for obvious reasons - lack of budget, no easy use of CGI). Apocalyptic, no doubt, but it was mostly detritus on the streets, some newspapers blowing around, a few smashed up cars and such. Land of the Dead, on the other hand, shows far more of the world around it in various states (including long, overgrowing plants - passage of time).

    2) All we know is the situation of the people in the bunker inside Day. We get very little information about what's going on in the outside world. The people they were talking to might have gone AWOL, or the link broke down (McDermott's radio is woefully out of date, remember, and barely functioning). Day is mankind scattered to the wind, the dazed chaos of a species that has been knocked for six - Land is the coming together afterwards. It simply is not in mankind's nature to just drift off into nothingness after getting battered.

    3) They re-established communications with communities they re-established. Kaufman explains himself that he paid for the setting up of these communities (which makes it clear that he was doing something after the fall of mankind, to rejuvenate the species' hold on the planet and not let it fall to the zombies forever). They took back sections of the world, built new defences, and gathered people back together again and reorganised them. That's one of the major points/themes that Land is working with - reflected in the zombies themselves, whose evolution in understanding is absolutely, positively, clearly AFTER the events of Day of the Dead and Bub. Bub goes from average-ish zombie to recognising Rhodes' rank and seeking revenge for the death of Logan. In Land we see Big Daddy go from lone wolf aware of what's happening to a leader of an entire army, putting guns in the hands of fellow zombies and teaching them (albeit crudely) how to fire them, he even instructs certain zombies (the Butcher) to perform tasks when their progress is hindered. Bub was never at that level - the evolution of the zombies alone screams loud and proud that Land takes place after Day. Romero spoke about it repeatedly himself, of Land's zombies being an evolution of those from Day. Evolution doesn't go backwards in time.

    4) *sigh* Again, this has been discussed to death, but the basics of it is thus: mankind understands the value of money and the cash-for-services system. It was a system that mankind had grown up on, and it would have only been 'put aside by the apocalypse' for what, a couple of years? They've got enough to deal with, establishing an entirely brand new economic system isn't going to be a priority. Also, if you didn't have that, you'd bugger up the entire plotline of Kaufman being the rich man in the ivory tower - he's using old world power and influence in the apocalypse to re-establish mankind as it once was. Money still has power, and is a simple system that is already understood by every single human being in that (and other) settlements. The thread dedicated to the subject went over it in far more detail - but suffice it to say, money in Land absolutely makes sense.

    5) By the time we come to Land the people have got used to the zombies - again, this was one of Romero's clearly stated objectives with the film as far back as the original script he wrote in the 1990s. It was about 'stepping over the problem and ignoring it', so therefore it stands to reason that the humans would be pretty capable of dealing with the zombies. However, even still, people get bitten, but for the most part we see people venturing out in organised groups (see points 2 and 3) with military vehicles, distraction techniques, body armour, and weapons galore. They've discovered ways to keep the zombies occupied (the "sky flowers") so they meet little resistance as they scavenge.

    In Day of the Dead you've got a handful of people with no organised pool of vehicles, weapons, armour, and certainly not the amount of people that they had scrounged together from the streets of Fiddler's Green to do the job. You've got a pilot, a radio man, a scientist, and one (collapsing) military guy. They're not a strong unit for venturing into the world.

    6) They've chosen a tactical location - what is almost an island (surrounded by rivers with the bridges up) - and the one strip of land is heavily guarded and defended. They explicitly state that the zombies got wise to the electric fences and opted to sod off elsewhere. In Day of the Dead, the particular group we follow, have been dumped into an old missile silo at a moment's notice (Sarah states that the whole operation was hastily put together - in the heat of the initial outbreak - they went there a few weeks in and have been stuck there for months). Land shows mankind getting themselves re-organised after the events of Day, which shows how mankind scurried to the nearest defendable safe place in a panic. Land shows mankind has taken a breather, got themselves together, and striking out into the world again. Simples.
    1- The average zombies in Day look more decayed than those of Land. Even their clothes look more worn down. All this suggests they have been around gradually decaying for a longer time.

    We see one large city in Day as an example of how things are looking by this time into the zombie crisis: it looks quite messy and abandoned, with garbage, debris, rotted corpses, rusting cars, wild animals have moved in... Now compare that to the "neater" look of both abandoned cities & towns we see as samples in Land.

    2- We can easily deduce quite more from what the people in the bunker say. These people have only been isolated from other parts of the US for some relative amount of time. We know they used to "talk to Washington all the time". It is very safe to assume that they were not exchanging "recipes" during their frequent talks with their bosses in Washington, but precisely about things that matter for the zombie crisis, like what the hell is going on up there and elsewhere. These people in the bunker do not show any signs whatsoever that the information they have gotten from their bosses in Washington looks any "good" at all. The fact that even the government itself has apparently vanished is an even worse sign that things "up there" are no better than "down there" where they are. This is all very different from what see in Land, where there still are some large pockets of survivors thriving "up there" right on Washington's next door.

    3- People like Kaufman were doing such things from very early on during the zombie crisis, the movie itself informs us that these outposts are not some development of the distant future.

    We don't know when some zombies started getting "smart". What we see in Land is just one zombie displaying the Bub-like behavior of showing some degree of intelligence that we saw in Day. All the other zombies we see are just as "dumb" as the ones we see in the other Romero movies, who are capable of "mimicking" some things they see or vaguely remember from their past lives and of using simple tools, but little else (this was already established in Dawn.) The only reason they "learn" to do some basic things is because Big Daddy shows them how, and then they just blindly "follow the leader". Where is this supposed "evolution" of most zombies? It seems like it is just one in a whole bunch that occasionally "get smart". Same situation we saw in Day.

    4- *Sigh* For money to have value there must be something backing it up. Whatever is it that is still backing up the US dollar in Land (perhaps the still lingering US government), it is certainly gone by the time of Day, where money lays on the streets like just another example of garbage. Money still had value in Dawn, though. Even as far as the crisis had already advanced by the time the biker gang assaults the mall (when there no longer are any government broadcasts anymore), evidently money was still a sought-for thing (the bikers waste no time looting the bank, so obviously even this far into the zombie crisis money still "talked" out there. This is certainly gone by the time of the much more decayed world of Day.)

    5- Some people in Land are in fact still so unfamiliar with the zombies that one of them even has to ask for information regarding how long does it take for a bitten person to die and become a zombie (and the answer given is yet another huge contradiction to Romero's previous movies, but that is another "nitpick".) You don't see this by the time of Day, though, where everyone is well aware of this situation. There pretty much can be no human left on Earth who isn't very familiar with the zombies and what happens when you get bitten by one by the time of Day. But such ignorance of what exactly happens to a bitten person is still seen in Dawn, though (once again suggesting that what happens in Land should in fact be closer to what happens in Dawn than to what happens in Day.)

    No vehicles in Day? Huge sections of the bunker are in fact FILLED with vehicles. Plus we know that at some point during their stay in the bunker they actually ventured outside to capture zombies (the zombies trapped in the section of the caves where the missile silo is were in fact put there on purpose, zombies captured on the outside by the soldiers and then brought down.) Judging by the amount of zombies they captured, it is very safe to assume that they likely used some of the vehicles down there to load and transport zombies to the caves. By the time we are allowed to see what's happening in Day, this is no longer an option. The soldiers now pretty much refuse to go outside anymore (that's why Sarah is against wasting any more specimens, since once they are gone the soldiers will likely not want to risk their lives going outside to capture more.) Things obviously have gotten worse since. More and more zombies everywhere.

    6- Again, Kaufman et al. did all this early during the zombie crisis. This is not some development of the distant future.

    We don't have any specific time reference in Day. All we know is that the operation they are currently involved in was put together in a rush (Sarah is referring to the start of the operation.) We don't know what they were doing before, and we don't know how long they have been down there since the operation started either.

    The people in the bunker in Day could technically leave whenever they wanted to. They had a helicopter and land vehicles (but notice that the soldiers do not consider them an option, they want the helicopter; that should tell you something about how dangerous they consider land-travel at this point, unlike the world of Land, where land-travel in pretty much any kind of vehicle is still very much an option), yet the problem of where to go to is always present. With the only exception of the scientists (who do show a genuine interest in trying to solve the problem), these people are not staying down there because they want to, but pretty much because they have little other choice left (the only other option left, as is suggested by the pilot, is to go to an isolated island. Notice that there is no such thing as these "outposts" of Land to be considered as options in Day. It's either a bunker or an island, take your pick!)
    Last edited by JDP; 15-Feb-2018 at 03:30 PM. Reason: ;

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    5- Some people in Land are in fact still so unfamiliar with the zombies that one of them even has to ask for information regarding how long does it take for a bitten person to die and become a zombie (and the answer given is yet another huge contradiction to Romero's previous movies, but that is another "nitpick".) You don't see this by the time of Day, though, where everyone is well aware of this situation. There pretty much can be no human left on Earth who isn't very familiar with the zombies and what happens when you get bitten by one by the time of Day. But such ignorance of what exactly happens to a bitten person is still seen in Dawn, though (once again suggesting that what happens in Land should in fact be closer to what happens in Dawn than to what happens in Day.)
    I'd like to dispute this point in particular, even though I disagree with all of the above points (apart maybe from the money, which is a dumb plot point but that's just Romero's overt way of criticizing capitalism).

    None of the characters in Day are aware of anything. In fact, the entire film revolves around them trying to figure out what is going on and to what extent the world has collapsed. They're all confused and several times the point is made that they don't know.

    Now you might argue that the people in Land don't all know how long it takes to turn, and the characters in Day do... Well, the characters in Day are a group of soldiers and scientists who have a single purpose - to study the phenomena. The characters in Land are bandits and crooks who are only out to steal and pillage. Of course the former are going to have a better understanding of the zombies than the latter.

    But as far as worldy awareness goes, the Land characters undoubtedly are much more secure in their knowledge than the characters in Day - who seem amazed that there's not a single soul out there for a 100 miles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EvilNed View Post
    I'd like to dispute this point in particular, even though I disagree with all of the above points (apart maybe from the money, which is a dumb plot point but that's just Romero's overt way of criticizing capitalism).

    None of the characters in Day are aware of anything. In fact, the entire film revolves around them trying to figure out what is going on and to what extent the world has collapsed. They're all confused and several times the point is made that they don't know.

    Now you might argue that the people in Land don't all know how long it takes to turn, and the characters in Day do... Well, the characters in Day are a group of soldiers and scientists who have a single purpose - to study the phenomena. The characters in Land are bandits and crooks who are only out to steal and pillage. Of course the former are going to have a better understanding of the zombies than the latter.

    But as far as worldy awareness goes, the Land characters undoubtedly are much more secure in their knowledge than the characters in Day - who seem amazed that there's not a single soul out there for a 100 miles.
    This is hardly what is shown in Day. The characters are pretty aware of the situation outside: there seems to be no one "out there"! They haven't encountered or heard from anyone else, not even the government itself (all the way right next door to those outposts of Land), for a while now. The fact that Logan can shut up Rhodes regarding his threats to take his men and leave the bunker already shows that they know there's little other choice for a safe dwelling place. But the case you bring up is actually worse for Land if, as you want to believe, they have actually been longer into the zombie crisis than the people down in that bunker in Florida. How come there's still people around in those outposts, supposedly so long into this mess, who do not even know something as basic as: you get bitten, you survive for a while, then die & turn into one of them??? No one has to tell this basic info to anyone in Day, they all know it very well (civilians & soldiers alike), it is an integral part of life & survival in this new messed up world they are in, yet you want to take the paradoxical position that these people in the bunker have actually been less time into the zombie crisis when they in fact show more familiarity with the subject. Doesn't make much sense, just like several other things between these two movies if you want to consider them in the Day--->Land order.

  14. #29
    Zombie Flesh Eater EvilNed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    This is hardly what is shown in Day. The characters are pretty aware of the situation outside: there seems to be no one "out there"! They haven't encountered or heard from anyone else, not even the government itself (all the way right next door to those outposts of Land), for a while now.
    Steel and Rickles are amazed that the others didn't find any sign of life on their helicopter trip. The privates still live in a bubble where communication with Washington is not a far-fetched idea.
    They do not know what's out there, they only speculate. This is clearly illustrated in the film.

  15. #30
    Chasing Prey shootemindehead's Avatar
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    Are we really going to do all this again?



    Look, I thought we all agreed that Night 90 had replaced the 1968 version. Land comes before Day, but ONLY if you watch the 2004 version of Dawn and the 1978 version of Dawn has been relegated to happening on some far away 1970's planet, where disco never died.

    It's fuckin simple folks.
    I'm runnin' this monkey farm now Frankenstein.....

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